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Descriptions of
Eastern Utah Areas:
1-10 11-20 21-30 31-40 41-48


DESCRIPTIONS OF EASTERN UTAH
BIRDING AREAS:
11 - 20

Below are descriptions of:
[11]  Leidy Peak
[12]  Dry Fork Canyon
[13]  Red Cloud Loop Scenic Backway
[14]  Taylor Mountain Road
[15]  Steinaker Lake and Red Fleet State Parks
[16]  Vernal to Dinosaur National Monument
[17]  Josie Morris Cabin
[18]  Stewart Lake WMA
[19]  Oxbow Pond
[20]  Pariette Wetlands


  [11]  Leidy Peak
The Leidy Peak area is a high elevation summer birding area. The road from the junction with the Red Cloud Loop Road (site #13) goes from approximately 8,000 feet to 11,000 feet in elevation. There are many areas along the road to stop and enjoy birding. Only the first 3.2 miles of FR-018 (Red Cloud Loop Road) are paved, then turn left on signed road leaving the pavement. The road is rough in spots and not recommended during winter, early spring or other wet weather situations. It is 24 miles from US-191 to the Uinta Highline Trailhead near Hacking Lake and Leidy Peak.

The area is very scenic with opportunities for primitive camping. A favorite is the Kaler Hollow primitive campground which is approximately 9 miles from US-191 along the 24-mile drive. Look for Dark-eyed Junco, Hairy Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, Mountain Bluebird, Green-tailed Towhee and more along the way. An option on the return trip is to take the Red Cloud Loop Road (FR-18) where it heads south (signed) and end up along Dry Fork and into Vernal (Sites #12 and #13).

This hotspot was selected as it is one of only a few places in Utah where a road reaches 11,000 feet and is close to ptarmigan habitat. Other opportunities, in Utah, to view White-tailed Ptarmigan require long walks, often over night backpacking trips. The ptarmigan use the slopes of Leidy Peak and are often viewed in the low willows just under the snowfields. The Uinta Highline Trail crosses good ptarmigan habitat near Leidy Peak. Or from the trailhead near Hacking Lake, walk in a west or southwest direction and bird across the alpine meadow towards the talus slopes of Leidy Peak. Look for ptarmigan at the base of Leidy Peak and on the north slope of the peak. In addition to the high elevation birds, the flowers are worth the walk.

In addition to high elevation birds like Rosy-Finch, Red Crossbill, Lincoln Sparrow, American Pipit, Cassin's Finch and White-crowned Sparrow, several of Utah's breeding birds display a post-nesting movement to higher elevations. These include American Kestrel, Northern Flicker, Western Wood Pewee, Green-tailed Towhee, Vesper Sparrow, and Brewer's Sparrow.

HABITATS: Pine, aspen, meadows, small lakes, and alpine.

FEATURED BIRDS: White-tailed Ptarmigan, Red Crossbill, Black Rosy-Finch and Gray Jay.

SEASON: Mid to late summer.

LOCATION: Turn west from US-191 on FR-018 approximately 21 miles north of Vernal. The Red Cloud Loop Road (FR-018) is well signed. The sign at the junction with FR-043 is marked as the Hacking Lake road. The trailhead is a short distance beyond Hacking Lake.

GPS COORDINATES: At the Highline Trailhead, 40 46' 38"N, 109 48' 54"W; at the US-191/FR-018 junction, 40 40' 36"N, 109 29' 11"W.

LAND OWNERSHIP: Ashley National Forest.

NOTES: This is a remote area. We recommend starting with a full tank of gas, good spare tire, and carrying food and water. Avoid wet and stormy weather.

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  [12]  Dry Fork Canyon
The Dry Fork road up to Brownie Canyon is very scenic. It then climbs to the higher elevations as part of the Red Cloud Loop (site #13). The Dry Fork and Brownie Canyon segments of the road offers excellent birding opportunities for the low elevation riparian birds and offer an opportunity for a short trip near Vernal.

Remember the Maine county park provides good birding in riparian vegetation just below the confluence of Dry Fork and Ashley Creek. An interesting "rock art" design is on the sandstone cliff across the road from the park. On the cliffs just south of the park, biologists have been monitoring Peregrine Falcon and Golden Eagle nest sites for several years. Driving further up Dry Fork at 1.6 miles past Remember the Maine there is a pullout (left side of road) and a short trail up a nearby canyon. Birding can be good and the distracting rock graffiti can be ignored. Further up Dry Fork at 5.2 miles above Remember the Maine Park there is an option to drive up the Deep Creek road and bird along the road or continue up Dry Fork to Brownie Canyon.

The Dry Fork Flume Trail is great for walking and birding. The trail begins on BLM managed lands and continues on National Forest System lands for several miles. There are many access points, however we will highlight only a couple. The first is to park at the first footbridge which is 7.5 miles past Remember the Maine Park. Cross Dry Fork, via the footbridge, and walk upstream as far as you like. The second option, is to go further up the canyon, 9.3 miles past Remember the Maine Park, and use a parking area recently constructed by BLM. This upper parking area also includes a restroom.

Drive 3.2 miles beyond Remember the Maine Park to view some world renown petroglyphs representing the Fremont culture which flourished in this area before 1200 A.D. It is believed this was a major Indian winter camp. The petroglyphs are found along a 200-foot-high sandstone cliff. Money contributions are accepted as the petroglyphs are on private land. We request that the signs are obeyed and the site is not damaged.

Dry Fork Canyon is between Vernal and the south end of the Red Cloud Loop Road (site #13). As the name implies, Dry Fork is dry much of the year. It is part of a karst geological system and typically the stream only runs in the spring. The adjacent forest is an interesting mix of aspen, ponderosa pine, Douglas fir and narrowleaf cottonwood. Various riparian loving shrubs are near the stream bottom. The adjacent dry hillsides add sagebrush, mountain mahogany, and juniper to the diversity mix. Look for White-throated Swift, Cooper's Hawk, White-breasted Nuthatch, Virginia's Warbler, MacGillivray's Warbler, Swainson's Thrush, Hermit Thrush, Broad-tailed Hummingbird, Plumbeous Vireo, Warbling Vireo, Western Tanager and more. The canyon is also good for owls with Great Horned Owl, Western Screech-Owl, Flammulated Owl and Northern Saw-whet Owl all observed occasionally.

HABITATS: Riparian and steep canyon walls.

FEATURED BIRDS: Yellow-breasted Chat, Western Wood-Pewee, and Bullock's Oriole.

SEASON: Yearlong.

LOCATION: In Vernal, travel west on 500N (UT-121) to 3500W, then drive north. Remember the Maine park is 3.7 miles north. Follow signs to Dry Fork Canyon.

GPS COORDINATES: Remember the Maine park, 40 30' 58"N, 109 35' 52"W. Dry Fork Nature Trail, 40 37' 28"N, 109 47' 12"W.

LAND OWNERSHIP: Private, County and Ashley National Forest.

NOTES:

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  [13]  Red Cloud Loop Scenic Backway
The Red Cloud Loop Scenic Backway is a 73 mile loop of paved and gravel surfaced roads from Vernal. Segments of this birding trail are mentioned in the description of other birding hotspots. We suggest driving 21 miles north of Vernal on US-191 then turning west on a signed road. After leaving US-191 the road is paved to East Park Reservoir, however, the Red Cloud Loop road is gravel from where it leaves the East Park Reservoir road at 2.4 miles from US-191 (mile 23.4 from Vernal). At mile 29.3 the Red Cloud Loop Road continues straight ahead, however, a left turn (south) would be a shortcut back to Vernal via the Taylor Mountain Road (site #14). At mile 35.6 is the junction onto the Hacking Lake Road which leads to the Leidy Peak Trailhead (site #11). There are many interesting pullouts and view areas along this scenic backway. At mile 46.3, take time to look over the area from the Brownie Canyon overlook. This provides a typical view of the high Uinta Mountain range. The road then drops several thousand feet into Brownie Canyon. The last section of the road goes down Dry Fork Canyon back to Vernal. Dry Fork Canyon is a rich riparian zone with cottonwood, willow, pine, and aspen and several picnic and camping areas (site #12).

The habitats are diverse from low elevation to high elevation. With this diversity comes a diversity of birds. Look for Golden Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk, Blue Grouse, Williamson's Sapsucker, American Three-toed Woodpecker, Hammond's Flycatcher, Pine Grosbeak, Gray Jay, Mountain Chickadee, White-breasted Nuthatch, Pygmy Nuthatch, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Mountain Bluebird, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Red Crossbill, Chipping Sparrow, Lincoln's Sparrow, Cassin's Finch, and more. For Lincoln's Sparrow sightings, try the boggy areas and small meadows around potholes on the road between Kaler Hollow and the Sim's Peak Turnoff.

HABITATS: Pinyon-juniper woodland, wet meadow, sagebrush, aspen and high elevation conifer.

FEATURED BIRDS: Mountain Bluebird, Clark's Nutcracker, Dark-eyed Junco, Lincoln's Sparrow, Brewer's Sparrow, and White-crowned Sparrow.

SEASON: Summer.

LOCATION: The access points for the Red Cloud Loop Road depend on which way the loop is traversed. One way is to drive north on US-191 for 21 miles to the north access point. The south access is up Dry Fork Canyon by going west in Vernal on 500 North (UT-121 to 3500W) to the Dry Fork Canyon Road.

GPS COORDINATES: Junction of US-191 and Red Cloud Loop (north), 40 40' 37"N, 109 29' 11"W. Junction of Deep Creek Road and Dry Fork road to the Red Cloud Loop (south), 40 33' 14"N, 109 40' 13"W.

LAND OWNERSHIP: Ashley National Forest.

NOTES: This is a remote area. We recommend starting with a full tank of gas, good spare tire, and carrying food and water.

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  [14]  Taylor Mountain Road
The Taylor Mountain Road goes north from Vernal as an alternative to traveling north on US-191 to the Red Cloud Loop Road. This hotspot highlights only the lower elevation habitats of first 10 miles of the road north of Vernal. However, the road goes through many habitat types from low elevation to high elevation. The drive from the low elevation areas near Vernal to the high elevation mountains along the Uinta Mountain spine is notable for it's diversity of habitats. There are three options for birding these habitats. One, by traveling (from Vernal) north on US-191, second on the Taylor Mountain Road, or third on the Dry Creek Road.

Habitats along the "lower" segment of the Taylor Mountain Road range from greasewood and sagebrush at lower elevations to lodgepole/ponderosa pine near Red Mountain. Look for Cooper's Hawk, Swainson's Hawk, Bald Eagle (winter), Peregrine Falcon, Pinyon Jay, Broad-tailed Hummingbird, Red-naped Sapsucker, Willow Flycatcher, Juniper Titmouse, Virginia's Warbler, Yellow-breasted Chat, Black-throated Gray Warbler, Brewer's Sparrow, and Greater Sage-Grouse and more.

HABITATS: Lowland riparian, shrub steppe, and pinyon-juniper.

FEATURED BIRDS: Greater Sage-Grouse, Willow Flycatcher, Juniper Titmouse, Virginia's Warbler, Black-throated Sparrow, and Sage Sparrow.

SEASON: Summer and fall.

LOCATION: Drive north of Vernal on the Taylor Mountain Road (2500 West) for about 10 miles. Birding is good along the way. If continuing north, the road junctions with the Red Cloud Loop Road in approximately 20 miles from Vernal.

GPS COORDINATES: Approximately 10 miles north of Vernal, 40 36' 04"N, 109 33' 57"W.

LAND OWNERSHIP: BLM and Ashley National Forest.

NOTES: The road can be hazardous during wet weather.

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  [15]  Steinaker Lake and Red Fleet State Parks
There is a Scenic Byway pullout, nature trail, and restroom at the north end of Steinaker Lake (west side of US-191) offering lakeside and cottonwood forest birding. Just beyond this pullout is a road heading west to Steinaker Lake State Park. The park fee is probably not warranted for a brief birding experience. However, if you're camping or have a Utah park pass, two birding options are suggested. First, park outside the gate to the group camp site which is open by reservation only. Walk to the east end of the parking lot and take the Eagle Ridge Nature Trail. The trail is about a mile long and goes through open desert and pinyon-juniper woodland. The trail also offers a view into Steinaker Lake. Second, drive past the campground to the boat dock at the south end of the state park. This area offers good birding for lakeshore species and there are short trails through pinyon-juniper woodlands, along rock cliffs, and through cottonwood trees at the edge of the reservoir.

Four miles north of Steinaker Lake State Park is the very similar Red Fleet State Park. Again, these state parks are primarily operated for water recreation and not for birding hotspots. Trails are present along the water edge going both ways from the boat ramp. Birding is often good during early morning and late evening. Look for Bald Eagle (winter), Golden Eagle, Black-billed Magpie, Prairie Falcon, Pinyon Jay, and more. Again, this might not be worth the entrance fee if you don't have a state park pass.

Without a state park pass, drive on US-191 one mile beyond the turnoff to Red Fleet State Park and turn right (east). This is an interesting road to a trail leading to dinosaur tracks. The beginning of the trail and around the trailhead looked interesting, however, I have not walked the trail. Birding along the road was good for pinyon-juniper and grassland species. Look for Black-throated Gray Warbler, Mountain Bluebird, Lark Sparrow, Mourning Dove, various flycatchers and more.

HABITATS: Cottonwood trees, open water and pinyon-juniper woodland.

FEATURED BIRDS: Osprey, Common Loon (migration) and various waterfowl on the lakes and Black-throated Gray Warbler and Gray Flycatcher throughout the uplands.

SEASON: Best in spring and fall when power boats and water skiers are less numerous. Uplands are good yearlong.

LOCATION: Five miles north of Vernal, Utah on US-191 (Steinacker Reservoir).

GPS COORDINATES: Pullout at north end of Steinaker Reservoir, 40 31' 53"N, 109 31' 20"W. Steinaker State Park, 40 31' 20"N, 109 32' 17"W. Dinosaur Track Trailhead, 40 36' 00"N, 109 26' 00"W.

LAND OWNERSHIP: Steinaker and Red Fleet State Parks. BLM outside the State Park boundaries.

NOTES: State Parks are fee areas with camping, boat docks, and restroom facilities.

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  [16]  Vernal to Dinosaur National Monument
Dinosaur National Monument offers several options for birding and sightseeing. The best birding areas are near the Josie Morris Cabin (site #17), the farmlands along the roads, and the nature trail between Split Mountain Campground and Green River Campground.

Much of eastern Utah is better known for its fossilized dinosaur bones than for birding. When in the vicinity of Vernal, visit the Utah Field House of Natural History State Park (496 E. Main). At Dinosaur National Monument, visit the world famous quarry wall with 1,600 exposed dinosaur bones from 11 species. The formation is from the Jurassic Period, some 140 million years ago. Dinosaur National Monument is over 190,000 acres in size with only 25% of the monument in Utah - the rest is in Colorado.

Another drive to observe dinosaur fossils, designated the Dinosaur Diamond National Scenic Byway, runs from Vernal to Fruita (Colorado) on US-40, CO-64 and CO-139, to Moab via I-70 and UT-128, to Green River, then to Price and back to Vernal on US-191. More information can be obtained about the Dinosaur Diamond Byway by visiting the Utah State Welcome Center at the US-40/UT-149 junction near Jensen and/or www.dinosaurdiamond.org.

Along the road from Jensen to the monument, look for Lewis' Woodpeckers on the telephone and power poles. Northern Pygmy-Owls are a possibility during the winter months. Look over the shrub habitats for Loggerhead Shrike, Brewer's Sparrow, Lark Sparrow, and more. Flocks of Sandhill Cranes use the fields north of Jensen during spring and fall migration. Biologists have counted as many as 4,000 in the fields between Stewart Lake (site #18) and Dinosaur National Monument. Cranes often remain in the area until after Thanksgiving during the fall migration. The increasing population of wintering Bald Eagles offer winter viewing opportunities. The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (UDWR) sponsors a Bald Eagle day in the area in early February.

An alternate birding route between Vernal and Dinosaur National Monument (other than US-40) is the Brush Creek Road which is approximately 15 miles long and paved. Traveling east from Vernal to the monument, take 500N in Vernal and continue east and southeast. If traveling from the monument to Vernal, take the Brush Creek Road approximately half way between Jensen and the monument border and head northwest and west into Vernal (500N). The junction of Brush Creek Road and UT-149 is at 40 24' 22"N, 109 20' 33"W. In addition to the more common species of riparian, agricultural, grassland habitats, three longspur species occasionally winter in the Uinta Basin and a flock of Eurasian Collared-Dove have made the area home. In addition to the featured birds, look for Blue Grouse, Chukar, Bald Eagle (winter), and Wild Turkey.

If interested in some "border" birding, drive on US-40 five miles east of the Colorado border where the main Dinosaur National Monument Visitor Center is located (2 miles east of Dinosaur, CO). A 31 mile long self-guided auto tour goes north from the visitor center to Harper's Corner. Most maps refer to this road as the Harper's Corner Road or the Harper's Corner Scenic Drive. There are several overlooks with spectacular views and several short nature trails along the way. The Island Park trailhead to Ruple Point is in Utah, however the road re-enters Colorado before reaching Harper's Corner. The Harper's Corner nature trail is 2 miles long (round trip) and goes through pinyon-juniper habitat to an overlook 2,300 feet above Echo Park and the Green River.

HABITATS: Sagebrush, desert shrub, pinyon-juniper.

FEATURED BIRDS: Greater Sage-Grouse, Blue Grouse, Gray Flycatcher, Say's Phoebe, Pinyon Jay, Black-throated Gray Warbler, and Green-tailed Towhee.

SEASON: Yearlong, except Harper's Corner Road that is closed in winter.

LOCATION: Drive 7 miles north of Jensen (US-40) on UT-149 to the quarry. The Harper's Corner Scenic Drive begins 5 miles east of the state line into Colorado. The Brush Creek Road is an extension of 500N when driving east from Vernal.

GPS COORDINATES: Quarry, 40 26' 26"N, 109 18' 15"W; Harper's Corner Overlook, 40 31' 28"N, 209 01' 08"W.

LAND OWNERSHIP: Dinosaur National Monument.

NOTES: Picnicking, camping, and restroom facilities are available. More information can be obtained at the Welcome Center located at the junction of US-40 and UT-149 near Jensen or at the entrance kiosk to the Monument.

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  [17]  Josie Morris Cabin
In 1914, 40-year old Josie Morris set out alone to ranch in this remote area. She spent the next 50 years at this location which is now part of Dinosaur National Monument. Visit an interesting panel of petroglyphs along the way. Maps and additional details can be obtained at the entrance gate to Dinosaur N.M.

The area around the cabin features riparian habitat with running water from a spring. After birding around the parking lot and cabin, take the short walk into the Box Canyon. The Box Canyon Trail leaves the parking lot near the restroom. Then plan on an hour or two to bird the trail past a pond and into Hog Canyon. Signs in the area are easy to follow. Look for Prairie Falcon, White-throated Swift, Gray Flycatcher, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Rock Wren, Canyon Wren, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Plumbeous Vireo, Virginia's Warbler, Black-throated Gray Warbler, Lazuli Bunting and more. At dusk, listen for Common Poorwill and Wilson Snipe calling.

Along the road to the Josie Morris Cabin, another birding hotspot is the nature trail between Split Mountain Campground and Green River Campground. This 1.8-mile trail runs north and south and can be walked from either campground. Habitats are variable with cottonwood groves in both campgrounds, riparian vegetation and sagebrush along the Green River, and running water in the river. Look for Common Goldeneye and Bald Eagle in winter. During summer, look for Eastern and Western Kingbird, Western Wood-Pewee, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Say's Phoebe, Yellow-breasted Chat, Bullock's Oriole, Black-throated Sparrow, Lazuli Bunting, and more.

HABITATS: Sandstone cliffs, open water, deciduous riparian, sagebrush, and pinyon-juniper.

FEATURED BIRDS: Peregrine Falcon, Prairie Falcon, Lewis' Woodpecker, Ash-throated Flycatcher, and Lazuli Bunting.

SEASON: Yearlong.

LOCATION: From Jensen (on US-40, 13 miles east of Vernal) follow signs to Dinosaur National Monument on UT-149. Continue past the quarry and the campgrounds to Josie Morris Cabin. The cabin is approximately 10 miles from the Monument entrance and the road to Green River Campground is approximately 4 miles from the Monument entrance.

GPS COORDINATES: Josie Morris Cabin, 40 25' 32"N, 109 10' 30"W. Green River Campground, 40 25' 13"N, 109 14' 35"W.

LAND OWNERSHIP: Dinosaur National Monument.

NOTES: Fee or pass required. Restrooms are located throughout the monument. An excellent information center is located at the junction of US-40 and UT-149 just west of Jensen.

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  [18]  Stewart Lake WMA
Stewart Lake Waterfowl Management Area (WMA) is on a bend of the Green River near a grove of cottonwoods called Bill Stewart Grove. The WMA consists of a cattail wetland surrounded by willow and cottonwood. The uplands are a combination of grassland and sagebrush. The area is a stop-over for large numbers of Sandhill Cranes and numerous waterfowl during spring and fall migrations. Bald Eagles are common winter residents. The area is part of the mitigation effort for wetlands inundated by Flaming Gorge Reservoir.

The gate to Stewart Lake WMA is usually closed and locked. Park outside the gate and walk the short distance to the wetlands. Birding is often good along this entrance road. Outside the gate are some pullouts leading to the Green River.

HABITATS: Marsh, open water, and surrounding uplands.

FEATURED BIRDS: Sandhill Crane (migration) and Bald Eagle (winter).

SEASON: Spring and fall migration.

LOCATION: The WMA is located 1 mile south of Jensen which is on US-40 13 miles east of Vernal. The road to Stewart Lake WMA goes south from US-40 at the junction where UT-149 goes north to Dinosaur National Monument. When the main road turns west, keep going straight to the WMA.

GPS COORDINATES: 40 21' 15"N, 109 20' 51"W.

LAND OWNERSHIP: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.

NOTES: Limited walk-in access with restrictions during nesting season. No facilities.

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  [19]  Oxbow Pond
To bird this oxbow remnant of a past Green River course, turn west from UT-45 less than a mile south of the Green River bridge. The road/trails are not maintained. Drive carefully and avoid wet areas in the road. Walking along the riparian and oxbow area offers good birding opportunities. The end of the road, near the river, is quite sandy and should be avoided by vehicle, but is good walking. If driving, we recommend stopping on the oxbow dyke at the southwest end of the pond and walking into the sandy area by the river.

The riparian area is a mixture of trees and shrubs with cottonwood, willow, Russian olive, tamarisk, boxelder, skunk bush, and much more. Look for Yellow-breasted Chat, Gray Catbird, Lark Sparrow, Black-headed Grosbeak, Black-chinned Hummingbird, Spotted Towhee, Great Blue Heron, Common Raven, Cliff Swallow, Mourning Dove, American Robin, Killdeer, and more.

South and southeast beyond Oxbow Lake on UT-45, then north to near Jensen offers more birding opportunities. Drive for approximately 13 miles south on UT-45, then take a road north (left turn) which joins US-40 near the Green River bridge east of Jensen. From Oxbow Pond to the Junction with US-40 is 27.5 miles. After turning northward, the road crosses grasslands then follow the Green River corridor to the bridge just east of Jensen. Look for Burrowing Owl, Loggerhead Shrike, Lark Sparrow, Vesper Sparrow, American Kestrel, Western Meadowlark, Mourning Dove and more. Scott's Oriole are a possibility along the road. Across the river from Stewart Lake (site #18) is a river access point (40 21' 07"N, 109 20' 36"W) that provides birding in a cottonwood riparian zone and a view for birds on the Green River.

HABITATS: Riparian, open water, wetlands, and surrounding uplands.

FEATURED BIRDS: Wild Turkey (Rio Grande race), Yellow-breasted Chat, Gray Catbird and Blue Grosbeak.

SEASON: Spring and fall for migrants and summer for nesting species.

LOCATION: Drive south through Naples on US-40. When US-40 swings east, remain south bound on UT-45 (1500E) for 7 miles. Oxbow Pond is just south of the Green River Bridge on the west side of road.

GPS COORDINATES: 40 18' 20"N, 109 29' 14"W.

LAND OWNERSHIP: BLM.

NOTES: No facilities.

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  [20]  Pariette Wetlands
The Pariette Wetlands are a unique marsh complex surrounded by many miles of arid desert. Pariette has been designated as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) by the BLM and consists of 9,033 acres of which 2,529 are wetlands. The marsh is made up of a perennial stream and 20 man-made ponds. This is BLM's largest waterfowl management area in Utah. Featured habitats include freshwater ponds, alkali bulrush, diverse emergent vegetation, wet meadow types, isolated sagebrush bottoms, and desert shrub. In addition to resting areas for migrating birds, the Pariette Wetlands provide summer breeding areas for many waterfowl, shorebird, and neotropical migrant species. More than 133 species of birds have been observed at Pariette. A large part of the wetlands and ponds can be viewed from the observation point. A detailed brochure is available at visitor centers in the Vernal area or from BLM, Vernal Field Office, 170 S and 500 E in Vernal.

Some birds listed for the area include Sage Sparrow, Mountain Plover (rare), Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Peregrine Falcon, Golden Eagle, Ferruginous Hawk, Swainson's Hawk, Burrowing Owl, Long-billed Curlew, Red-necked Phalarope, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Clark's Grebe, Sandhill Crane, Lewis's Woodpecker, and many waterfowl species.

HABITATS: Freshwater marsh and associated uplands

FEATURED BIRDS: Ferruginous Hawk, Sage Sparrow and Long-billed Curlew.

SEASON: Yearlong, but best in spring and fall.

LOCATION: Drive south from Fort Duchesne for about 5 miles, just past the Duchesne River. Then at the Myton "Y" turn south off the paved road and travel another 16 miles (the correct road goes south, the incorrect road parallels the Duschesne River and goes primarily east). Or, turn south from US-40 one mile west of Myton on the Sand Wash-Green River access turnoff. In 1.7 miles proceed on the left fork and follow the signs for 23 miles. The observation point location and other information can be found on the adequately signed area. The information kiosk is just west of Observation Point.

GPS COORDINATES: Observation Point, 40 01' 52"N, 109 46' 13"W.

LAND OWNERSHIP: BLM.

NOTES: We suggest acquiring the detailed Pariette Wetlands brochure produced by BLM.

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